Abuse of Power

Abuse of Power

Abuse of power, in the form of “malfeasance in office” or “official misconduct,” is the commission of an unlawful act, done in an official capacity, which affects the performance of official duties. Malfeasance in office is often grounds for a for cause removal of an elected official by statute or recall election. Abuse of power can also mean a person using the power they have for their own personal gain.

Fa Zheng

Fa Zheng, a Chinese man, was appointed as the Administrator (太守) of Shu commandery (蜀郡) and “General Who Spreads Martial Might” (揚武將軍) by Liu Bei. He oversaw administrative affairs in the vicinity of Yi Province’s capital Chengdu and served as Liu Bei’s chief adviser.

During this period of time, he abused his power by taking personal revenge against those who offended him before and killing them without reason. Some officials approached Zhuge Liang, another of Liu Bei’s key advisers, and urged him to report Fa Zheng’s lawless behaviour to their lord and take action against him. However, Zhuge Liang replied, “When our lord was in Gong’an (公安), he was wary of Cao Cao’s influence in the north and fearful of Sun Quan’s presence in the east. Even in home territory he was afraid that Lady Sun might stir up trouble. He was in such a difficult situation at the time that he could neither advance nor retreat. Fa Xiaozhi supported and helped him so much, such that he is now able to fly high and no longer remain under others’ influence. How can we stop Fa Zheng from behaving as he wishes?” Zhuge Liang was aware that Liu Bei favoured and trusted Fa Zheng, which was why he refused to intervene in this matter.

Police

In dictatorial, corrupt, or weak states, police officers may carry out many criminal acts for the ruling regime with impunity.

Individual officers, or sometimes whole units, can be corrupt or carry out various forms of police misconduct; this occasionally happens in many forces, but can be more common where police pay is very low unless supplemented by bribes. Police officers sometimes act with unwarranted brutality when they overreact to confrontational situations, to extract a confession from a person they may or may not genuinely suspect of being guilty

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